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Get a glimpse of what's happening on Notre Dame College's bustling campus.

Donors Gather for President’s Club Dinner

Notre Dame College’s most generous supporters gathered in the Great Room for the annual President’s Club Appreciation Dinner on Saturday, January 31. Donors who gave $1,000 and more in 2008 were invited to the event that was preceded by Mass in the Christ the King Chapel. Among the guests were the family of Therese Buettner Hummer ’46, whose generous donation helped to renew the Chapel, as well as representatives from the Esther and Hyman Rapport Philanthropic Trust and National City Bank. President Dr. Andrew Roth and Joan McCarthy, chair of the board of directors, thanked the attendees for their support, without which many of the College’s recent projects wouldn’t have been possible. “You are the College’s most loyal supporters,” said McCarthy. “You make a difference at Notre Dame and you make a difference in our region and beyond.”

Discussing “The Politics of Place”

Dr. Bruce Jones is the College's first President's Lecturer.The “white flight” from Cleveland suburbs and increasing migration of people to satellite communities was the topic of the first President’s Lecture in the Great Room on Tuesday, March 24. Dr. Bruce Jones, professor of education, discussed this demographic shift with full-time faculty, students, senior administrators and selected guests. In his lecture titled “The Politics of Place” Dr. Jones explained the reasons for this movement are grounded in socioeconomic issues as well as faith and comfort.

Over the past ten years, Dr. Jones gathered anecdotal and ethnographic data during more than 1,000 visits to schools while supervising teacher candidates for the College. He also utilized data collected during presidential elections and drew upon the works of authors David Berreby, William Bishop and Harvard psychologist Dr. Daniel Gilbert. Dr. Jones based his lecture on Gilbert’s premise that “most of us make at least three important decisions in our lives: where to live, what to do, and with whom to do it.” The new President’s Lecture will be held annually at Notre Dame to showcase the faculty’s expertise. 

Professional Development Center in New Hands

Notre Dame’s Center for Continuing and Professional Development has a new director. Sherreé Anderson took charge of the Center in January. She joined the College from real estate company Forest City Enterprises, where she spent four years in education and development. Anderson is a forward-thinking and accomplished management professional who also worked at National City Bank as assistant vice president and at KeyBank as an IT audit risk consultant. “Sherreé brings enthusiasm, energy, and new ideas to our Center,” said Dr. Mary Breckenridge, vice president for academic affairs. The Center is a provider of continuing education for professionals in education, business, human services, health care, athletic coaching, and law enforcement. It offers programs for personal development to attain or maintain certifications, licenses and registrations.

Raising Awareness About Africa

The Lost Boys of Sudan with Justice president Philly Meluch (far right) and vice president Jason George (thrid from left).Notre Dame’s Tolerance Resource Center and the student club Justice sponsored the College’s First Africa Awareness Week from April 20 to 26. Under the theme of “Why Should We Care,” several campus events highlighted issues of genocide, child soldiers, AIDS, drought and fair trade on the African continent. Invisible Children, a non-profit founded to bring peace to Northern Uganda by highlighting the plight of its child soldiers through documentary filmmaking, presented its newest film “Go!” Other visitors included the Lost Boys of Sudan, who talked about their experiences escaping the genocide in their country, and Sr. Valerie Sweeney, SND, who discussed the Notre Dame missions in Africa. Notre Dame students competed in a social justice essay contest exploring the theme of the week. The winners were Philomena Meluch, Erica Witmer and Jennifer Stursa.

Women Communication Leaders Tell Their Stories

A quartet of distinguished women communication professionals discussed their careers during the College’s fourth annual Women’s Leadership Forum on Wednesday, February 25. In a crowded Performing Arts Center, the panelists talked about the importance of reading, dealing with rejections and how to stand out in a competitive job market. Susan Goldberg, the editor of the Plain Dealer, described how she began her journalism career at the Seattle Post Intelligencer after previously receiving 72 rejection letters. Diane Roman Fusco, director of public relations at Safeguard Properties, started her career as a backup to the receptionist at a PR firm that she bought 13 years later. Freelance producer Michelle Redmond ’75, who traveled the world after graduating from Notre Dame, said hard work can get you anywhere. She is currently the director of content and production for a digital media network. Well-known spiritual author and educator Sr. Melannie Svoboda, SND '67, who was formerly the Provincial for the Sisters of Notre Dame in Chardon, said “remembering what you really want” in life will help you find your way. The evening was moderated by Associate Professor of English Sr. Eileen Quinlan, SND '74.

Spring Break in the Sisters’ Spirit

Jennifer Scott (left) and students David Chadowski, Annie-Laurie Trueblood, Chrissy Oravec and Maria Lopex built homes for Habitat for Humanity.When the Sisters of Notre Dame founded the College in 1922, they did so in the spirit of service to their community. Building upon that tradition, Notre Dame provides its students with many service opportunities. One of them is the annual Habitat for Humanity Alternative Spring Break Trip during which students build affordable homes for low-income families. This March, AmeriCorps Vista Campus Collaborator Jennifer Scott took nine students to Huntsville, Ala., where they joined Habitat’s Women Build volunteer program. Habitats for Humanity affiliates across the country regularly organize these projects, which have helped construct over 1,400 houses. The students spent a week in Huntsville and stayed at a United Methodist Church. On its way back, the group also visited Nashville, Tenn.